Common Grammar Mistakes: What Do We Do Wrong?

Common Grammar Mistakes: What Do We Do Wrong?





Common Grammar Mistakes: What Do We Do Wrong?

The English language is the lingua franca of the century. This status of it comes up with several grammar misusages that are done by the people. Some of these mistakes are done by the people who are not native speakers. Being the native speaker of any language does not mean that all the grammar rules will be followed correctly by the person. Also, several grammar misusages are only done by native speakers. Here they are some common grammar mistakes. What do we do wrong about them? Let’s examine together.

The usage of the double negative

In the grammar of the English language, there is nothing like a double negative. This mistake’s origin is mostly non-native speakers, their effort to directly translating the sentences from their native language. In other words, when these people speaking in English, they think in their native language. This is wrong. Generally, the words “any” and “no” have a crucial role in that mistake. Examine the correct and incorrect samples below.



  1. I do not know nothing. (incorrect, wrong pronoun)

I do not know anything. (correct)

  1. Sometimes I feel like I have not loved by nobody. (incorrect, wrong pronoun)

Sometimes I feel like I have not loved by anybody. (correct)

  1. My son did not never call his colleague that word. (incorrect, a negative verb with a negative pronoun)

My son did not call his colleague that word. (correct)

  1. The IT guy did not have neither her IP address nor her computer’s MAC number. (incorrect, a negative verb with the negative conjunction (neither/nor))





The IT guy had neither her IP address nor her computer’s MAC number. (correct)

The usage of the wrong tense

In general, most of the people have a tendency to use wrong tenses. This is one of the common grammar mistakes people do. This issue happens frequently in long speeches. When people are giving a long simultaneous speech, it is possible to forget to use the right tense on the sentences. This mistake occurs, especially in the past tense.

  1. I did not saw you last summer. Where have you been? (incorrect)

I did not see you last summer. Where have you been? (correct)

  1. My girl, tell me where did you slept last night? (incorrect)

My girl, tell me where did you sleep last night? (correct)

  1. I walk to the place then saw your mom. (incorrect. It is hard to know the correct timeline in this sentence. The verbs should be “walked” and “saw” or “walk” and “see”)




The usage of two comparatives or superlatives together

In the structure of English grammar, two comparatives or superlatives can never be used together. This usage is one of the common grammar mistakes people do. When people want to enhance the power of the words they use, they often make this mistake.

  1. It is always more better to do activities together. (incorrect, two comparatives are together)

It is always better to do activities together. (correct)

  1. You are the most best friend I have ever had. Thank you for that. (incorrect, two superlatives are together)

You are the best friend I have ever had. Thank you for that. (correct)

  1. My father is more stronger than your father. (incorrect, two comparatives are together.)

My father is stronger than your father. (correct)



The usage of “say” and “tell”

Remember Walter White from Breaking Bad and his famous line: “Say my name”.  Our beloved high school teacher was using the word “say” correctly. But people have always been confused when using the words “say” and “tell”. This case is one of the common grammar mistakes people do. The word ”say” is used in direct speech. The word “tell” is used in reported speech. It is hard to describe without any examples. Let’s find out how to use these words properly. Unlike the aforementioned examples above we will express the same sentence by using tell and say.

  1. Son, your life is an open book; do not close it before it is done, mama said.

Mama told me my life was an open book and I should not close it before it was done.

  1. It is a good day to be alive sir, he said.

The lord told me it was a good day to be alive.

  1. Gather around my children, I will tell you a story.
  2. I say you don’t know; you say you don’t know. I say, take me out! (In the word “say” the using the same words important.)
  3. My girl, tell me where did you sleep last night? (In the word “tell” the actual or expected information is important).
  4. Not developed societies are interested in what you said. The developed societies are interested in what you told. (First sentence points out the importance of the usage of language. The second sentence points out the importance of the knowledge you transferred.)




The usage of fewer and less

In the English language, it is always been important to know the difference between countable and uncountable things. Because this knowledge affects our daily usage of some specific words like “fewer” and “less”. On one hand, the word “fewer” is used with countable things. On the other hand, the word “less” is used with uncountable things. The misusage of them is one of the common grammar mistakes people do. Let’s see some correct and incorrect usage of the words “fewer” and “less”.

  1. When I go out to the street, I see less people day by day because of coronavirus. They should be afraid. (incorrect, people are countable things)

When I go out to the street, I see fewer people day by day because of coronavirus. They should be afraid. (correct)

  1. There were fewer milks in the market. I could not find enough. (incorrect. In that case, milks are uncountable. To consider them countable there should be a collective noun.)

There was less milk in the market. I could not find enough. (correct)


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