Idioms About Weather, List of Weather Idioms

English Idioms List, Definitions and Examples, Idioms About Weather, List of Weather Idioms

English Idioms List, Definitions and Examples, Idioms About Weather, List of Weather Idioms



There are many phrases in English to strengthen communication. Some of the idioms that add meaning to the weather-related sentence are as follows;

A storm of protest; means that a situation in which people suddenly protest about or criticize something, showing very strong feelings.

  • The government plan to raise the taxes provoked a storm of protest.

 

To be under a cloud (of suspicion); means that to be suspected of doing something illegal or wrong.

  • I left the office under a cloud of suspicion.
  • The only cloud on the horizon was the final exam in July.

 

A sunny smile; means that a happy and friendly smile.

  • The air hostess greeted the passengers with a sunny smile.

 

A storm in a teacup; means that a lot of fuss about something unimportant.

  • That’s a storm in a teacup, stop fussing about it, you can do it.

(Here is 300 English Idioms, Definitions and Example Sentences)

To flood the market; means that to produce and a sell a large number of one type of thing, so that its price goes down.

  • They have the intention to flood the market with their new mobile phones.

 

To be flooded with something; means that to receive so many letters or inquiries that you cannot deal with all of them.

  • We’ve been flooded with letters, but we will try to answer them all.




In floods of tears; means that crying a lot.

  • The little girl arrived in floods of tears.

 

To take the wind out of somebody’s sails; means that to make somebody lose their confidence, especially by saying or doing something unexpected.

  • She was ready to tell him that the relationship was over, but he appeared with a big bunch of flowers. That took the wind out of her sails.

 

To weather the storm; means that to experience a difficult period and reach the end of it without being harmed too much.

  • We’re undergoing a difficult situation, but I will weather the storm.

 

To be under the weather; means that to be slowly ill.

  • You look a bit under the weather. What’s the matter?

 

To have one’s head in the clouds; means that to think about something that is unpractical.

  • Come on, you always have your head in the clouds. It’s time to get back to reality!

 

To not have the foggiest idea; means that to not know something at all.

  • None of us had the foggiest idea about how to use the computer.

 

Here is Other Weather Idioms and Meanings;

Come rain or shine Whatever happens
On cloud nine Very happy
Brainstorm To generate many ideas quickly
Take sth by storm to overwhelm someone or something by becoming famous quickly
Stealing my thunder Making people pay attention to you
A cold day in July Something that will never happen
Take a rain check Decline an invitation but maybe you will accept it another time
A ray of sunshine Something that brings happiness to someone
Once in a blue moon Very rarely

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