The Weather, Talking About The Weather In English

The Weather, Talking About The Weather In English

The Weather, Talking About The Weather In English


The Weather in English

There are many adjectives you can use for describing the weather in daily life. Some of them are very similar in meaning (hot and warm) and a little harder to distinguish, while others are completely different (rainy and sunny) and easier to remember. In addition to learning these terms, you should consider practicing them often.

Even at more formal occasions, weather is a popular topic for small talk. That might be due to the fact that the weather is often different from day to day and from place to place, making it a relevant subject for everyone. To fully participate in these conversations, you’ll need lots of English words and phrases in your vocabulary.

 

Hot / Warm

When we say it’s hot, we’re referring to very high temperatures, like you find in the middle of summer when the heat can get quite uncomfortable. When it is warm though, temperatures are pretty high but bearable.

Example Sentences;

  • When the weather is warm, I prefer clothing like t-shirts and skirts.
  • Today is so hot that I’ve been sitting under the heater.

 

Cold / Cool

Cold refers to very low temperatures, close to freezing.

Example Sentences;

  • On cool days, you should be fine with a light jacket.
  • Don’t forget your coat; it’s cold outside.



Sunny / Rainy

Sunny weather means there’s lots of sunshine. Rainy means that lots of rain.

Example Sentences;

  • On sunny days, I like to go to the beach with my babies.
  • Rainy days are the best time to go to the library and read a book.

 

Clear / Cloudy

A clear day is bright. There no signs of bad weather. It means the skies are filled with clouds with little or no sun.

 

Dry / Humid

When it’s dry, there’s no rain or moisture in the air. When it’s humid, the air is moist and contains a large amount of water vapor. Humid weather usually makes us perspire (sweat) more.

 

Gusty / Windy

These adjectives describe the wind. Gusty is a sudden outburst. Windy weather is stronger than normal wind blows.

 

Thunder / Lightning

These two nouns are often used together when referring to storms. Thunder is the loud booming sound which usually follows a flash of lightning in the sky.

 


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