Types of Adverbs, Definition and Examples

English Using Adverbs, Types of Adverbs, Definition and Examples

English Using Adverbs, Types of Adverbs, Definition and Examples



Types of Adverbs, Definition and Examples

In this lesson, we will learn the types and definitions of adverbs and reinforce them with examples. There are many different types of adverbs in the English language and they all have their own rules and exceptions. However, manner adverbs, frequency adverbs, time adverbs, degree adverbs and place adverbs are the most commonly used.




Let’s learn more about these types of adverbs and explain them with examples. In order to avoid complexity, if any situation is not common or important, we often need to look at the rules rather than address it.

Adverbs of Time

Time adverbs describe how long and when an action occurred. These are widely used in English and their placement in the sentence is quite clear. Their positions are generally at the end of the sentence. In most cases, the time frame is at the end of the sentence. For example:

  • I have been cycling for 5 years, but I have been going to school by bike since last December.
  • John arrived last week, in March 2020.

As you can see, this rule works in adverbs that answer the question “When” or “How long”.

In some cases, time adverbs may appear at the beginning of the sentence. A time frame can also be placed at the beginning of the sentence if the speaker wants to emphasize when the action is taking place. For example;

  • I went to the doctor for an annual check up last month and today my stomach hurts.





The speaker emphasizes the sequence of events (often unfortunate) using this sequence. If a person wants to describe that event in a simple way, he can say:

  • I went to the doctor for annual checks the last day, so I won’t have to go again another the year.

If there is more than one time frame in a sentence, “How long?” The adverb answering the question is usually “When?” comes before the adverb answering the question. For example;

  • I have traveled for the past 2 months.

However, if you want to emphasize time or make a distinction between “this year” and “last year”, you can say:

  • I did not travel last month to raise money. This month, I can travel for a long time.

Adverbs of Manner

Manner adverbs tell us how something happened. There are many words in this group, including those created by adding the –ly tag to an adjective. For example, “nicely” is an adverb derived from the adjective “nice”. The following two sentences are similar in meaning, but the first is an adjective, while the second is an adverbs derived from that adjective.

  • He has a nice voice.
  • He sings nicely.

Sometimes adverbs precede the verb. For example, many manner adverbs such as carelessly, slowly or carefully are used before the verb.

  • He slowly opened the door and reluctantly looked his friend.
  • The cat quickly ate the food.

In some cases, manner adverbs come immediately after an intransitive verb. A case adverb used with an intransitive verb (that is an object that does not take objects) can come immediately after that verb. If there is a phrase consisting of preposition and name, it comes after the adverbs. For example;

  • Jesica walks carefully along the road.

Normally we should use the “carefully” adverb before the preposition – noun phrase, but there are also people who use it after the phrase. ‘’Well’’, another frequently used adverb is the adverb of the adjective “good”. As in this example, this category also works.

  • My father drives well.

In some cases, adverbs come after the object of the transitive verb. A case adverb can also come after the object. Therefore, the above sentences have another correct order: For example;

  • Sera opened the door slowly and looked reluctantly garden.




Adverbs of Frequency

Frequency adverbs such as weekly, daily, quarterly or annually tell the listener how often an action takes place. Sometimes frequency adverbs come before the main verb and after the auxiliary verb. If there is only one verb in the sentence, the adverb is written right after that. If there is an auxiliary verb, the adverb comes after the auxiliary verbs and before the main verb. For example;

  • Timmy always writes at day. (There is only one verb here, so “writes,” so the adverb comes first.)
  • They should always get up early in the morning. (The adverb is written after the auxiliary verb “should” and before the verb “get up”.)

Frequency adverbs such as twice a week, every day, or each year can be at the beginning of a sentence if the speaker wants to emphasize how often something happens. For example;

  • Every day Angelina comes to work late.
  • Twice a week Tim runs 25 kilometers.

Adverbs of Place

Location adverbs inform the speaker about the location where an action occurred. “Where did an action take place?” This question can only be asked to verbs, as they answer the question. Place adverbs such as around, outside, here, nearby, there and everywhere are at the end of the sentence. This adverb comes after the main verb or the object of the main verb. For example;

  • The students like to play outside.
  • They are planning a vacation nearby.

“Here” and “There” are sometimes at the beginning of the sentence. If there is an exclamation, the order of the sentence following that exclamation is reversed.

Adverbs of Degree

Degree adverbs like very, too, extremely or enough give us information about the density of something. These adverbs usually precede the adjective, adverb or verb they replace. But there are some exceptions to this. Unlike place adverbs, such adverb replace adjective and adverb as well as verb. For example;

  • I totally agree with Tom!
  • Tomas really want a new computer.




(Adverbs “totally” and “really” replace the verbs of “agree” and “want”.)

Negative qualification words such as hardly, seldom, scarcely or rarely may be at the beginning of the sentence. In this case, the order of the sentence following it is reversed (the auxiliary verb comes before the subject). This structure is much rarer and sounds official or poetic. For example:

  • Scarcely did Timmy work during weekends in his 45 years at the company.
  • Rarely did Jesica leave the house.

That’s all, the five most common types of English adverbs. They tell you how something happened, as well as when it happened, how often it happened, and where it happened. They also give you an idea of ​​the level of certainty associated with this action.

Here are Types of Adverbs Words List;

Adverbs of Manner Adverbs of Time
Beautifully

Boldly

Bravely

Calmly

Carefully

Cautiously

Cheerfully

Joyously

Eagerly

Gladly

Easily

Elegantly

Equally

Faithfully

Frankly

Honestly

Generously

Gently

Justly

Kindly

Neatly

Obediently

Patiently

Openly

Perfectly

Always

Already

Annually

Before

Constantly

Daily

Early

Earlier

Eventually

Ever

Finally

First

Formerly

Fortnightly

Generally

Hourly

Immediately

Infrequently

Just

Later

Lately

Monthly

Not until

Now

Normally

Adverbs of Place Adverbs of Frequency
Above

Abroad

Along

Away

Back

Behind

Below

Downstairs

East

Far

Here

Indoors

Inside

Nearby

Next door

Off

Out

Outside

Overseas

Right

Somewhere

There

Under

Underground

Up

Always

Constantly

Often

Frequently

Generally

Normally

Usually

Regularly

Sometimes

Occasionally

Infrequently

Rarely

Seldom

Hardly ever

Almost never

Never

Ever

Hourly

Daily

Nightly

Weekly

Monthly

Yearly

Annually


Add Comment